snapdragon-fr:

tackysnaps:

Happy Monday!  Apologies for the delay today, vacation is great. XD  Since I should bed at a reasonable hour tonight, this one will run a bit late. :)
Rebagel with your username and lair id
You do not have to be following me!
One entry per person, likes do not count
Ends at 15:00 FR time, September 2nd.
Good luck and thanks for stopping by!  Check in every Monday here for a giveaway, and every Friday with skysamba for another totally awesome giveaway!

Snapdragon 27066!

Demonfeathers #52507

snapdragon-fr:

tackysnaps:

Happy Monday!  Apologies for the delay today, vacation is great. XD  Since I should bed at a reasonable hour tonight, this one will run a bit late. :)

  • Rebagel with your username and lair id
  • You do not have to be following me!
  • One entry per person, likes do not count
  • Ends at 15:00 FR time, September 2nd.

Good luck and thanks for stopping by!  Check in every Monday here for a giveaway, and every Friday with skysamba for another totally awesome giveaway!

Snapdragon 27066!

Demonfeathers #52507

124 notes

karkats-screaming-tentadick:

hippopotthefuckingllamas:

So youre telling me an Onix alone couldn’t pull Charizard out of the pipe….

onix has 45 attack which is the same as butterfree he’s a weak ass motherfucker and couldn’t pull himself out of a wet paper bag.

karkats-screaming-tentadick:

hippopotthefuckingllamas:

So youre telling me an Onix alone couldn’t pull Charizard out of the pipe….

onix has 45 attack which is the same as butterfree he’s a weak ass motherfucker and couldn’t pull himself out of a wet paper bag.

(Source: unconscious-mindset, via officialjipersnoe)

179,405 notes

rneerkat:

rneerkat:

rneerkat:

what do boxes breath

boxygen

image

i stand corrected

(via officialjipersnoe)

99,943 notes

mindblowingscience:

When science meets aboriginal oral history


In Inuit oral history, the Tuniit loom both large and small.
They inhabited the Arctic before the Inuit came, and they were a different stock of people — taller and stronger, with the muscularity of polar bears, the stories say. A Tuniit man could lift a 1,000 pound seal on his back, or drag a whole walrus. Others say the Tuniit slept with their legs in the air to drain the blood from their feet and make them lighter, so they could outrun a caribou.
But despite their superior strength and size, the Tuniit were shy. They were “easily put to flight and it was seldom heard that they killed others,” according to one storyteller in the book “Uqalurait: An Oral History of Nunavut.” The Inuit took over the best hunting camps and displaced the conflict-averse Tuniit. Soon enough, these strange people disappeared from the land.
This week, the prestigious journal Science published an unprecedented paleogenomic study that resolves long-held questions about the people of the prehistoric Arctic. By analyzing DNA from 169 ancient human specimens from Canada, Alaska, Siberia, and Greenland, the researchers concluded that a series of Paleo-Eskimo cultures known as the Pre-Dorset and Dorset were actually one population who lived with great success in the eastern Arctic for 4,000 years — until disappearing suddenly a couple generations after the ancestors of the modern Inuit appeared, around 1200 A.D. There is no evidence the two groups interbred.
The Dorset are almost certainly the Tuniit of Inuit oral history.
“The outcome of the genetic analysis is completely in agreement, namely that the Paleo-Eskimos are a different people,” says Eske Willerslev, a co-author of the Science study.
It’s not the first time his genomic research has synchronized neatly with indigenous oral traditions.
In February, when Willerslev and colleagues announced they had sequenced the genome of a 12,500-year-old skeleton found in Montana, the results showed that nearly all South and North American indigenous populations were related to this ancient American. Shane Doyle, a member of the Crow tribe of Montana, said at the time: “This discovery basically confirms what tribes have never really doubted — that we’ve been here since time immemorial, and that all the artifacts and objects in the ground are remnants of our direct ancestors.” The sequenced genome of an Aboriginal from Australia also revealed findings in line with the local communities’ oral histories, Willerslev says.
“Scientists are sitting around and academically discussing different theories about peopling of Americas, and you have all these different views on how many migrations, and who is related to,” he says. “Then when we actually undertake the most sophisticated genetic analysis we can do today, and this is state of the art, genetically — we could have just have listened to them in the first place.”
He was laughing when he said that. But he and many others are serious when they say that scientists need to revaluate the weight they give traditional indigenous knowledge.
“This is a pretty common theme. It’s really surprising that scientists and general commentators don’t appreciate the knowledge collection and transmission of indigenous peoples, given the wealth of knowledge about medicine, physiology, geology, earth sciences, wind patterns, ice fluctuations — the incredible scope of knowledge that indigenous people have and have sustained them in North America for tens of thousands of years,” says Hayden King, director of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University and a member of the Beausoleil First Nation on Georgian Bay.
“It defies logic that this knowledge they’ve generated and transmitted wouldn’t be accurate and helpful in myriad ways.”



Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

When science meets aboriginal oral history

In Inuit oral history, the Tuniit loom both large and small.

They inhabited the Arctic before the Inuit came, and they were a different stock of people — taller and stronger, with the muscularity of polar bears, the stories say. A Tuniit man could lift a 1,000 pound seal on his back, or drag a whole walrus. Others say the Tuniit slept with their legs in the air to drain the blood from their feet and make them lighter, so they could outrun a caribou.

But despite their superior strength and size, the Tuniit were shy. They were “easily put to flight and it was seldom heard that they killed others,” according to one storyteller in the book “Uqalurait: An Oral History of Nunavut.” The Inuit took over the best hunting camps and displaced the conflict-averse Tuniit. Soon enough, these strange people disappeared from the land.

This week, the prestigious journal Science published an unprecedented paleogenomic study that resolves long-held questions about the people of the prehistoric Arctic. By analyzing DNA from 169 ancient human specimens from Canada, Alaska, Siberia, and Greenland, the researchers concluded that a series of Paleo-Eskimo cultures known as the Pre-Dorset and Dorset were actually one population who lived with great success in the eastern Arctic for 4,000 years — until disappearing suddenly a couple generations after the ancestors of the modern Inuit appeared, around 1200 A.D. There is no evidence the two groups interbred.

The Dorset are almost certainly the Tuniit of Inuit oral history.

“The outcome of the genetic analysis is completely in agreement, namely that the Paleo-Eskimos are a different people,” says Eske Willerslev, a co-author of the Science study.

It’s not the first time his genomic research has synchronized neatly with indigenous oral traditions.

In February, when Willerslev and colleagues announced they had sequenced the genome of a 12,500-year-old skeleton found in Montana, the results showed that nearly all South and North American indigenous populations were related to this ancient American. Shane Doyle, a member of the Crow tribe of Montana, said at the time: “This discovery basically confirms what tribes have never really doubted — that we’ve been here since time immemorial, and that all the artifacts and objects in the ground are remnants of our direct ancestors.” The sequenced genome of an Aboriginal from Australia also revealed findings in line with the local communities’ oral histories, Willerslev says.

“Scientists are sitting around and academically discussing different theories about peopling of Americas, and you have all these different views on how many migrations, and who is related to,” he says. “Then when we actually undertake the most sophisticated genetic analysis we can do today, and this is state of the art, genetically — we could have just have listened to them in the first place.”

He was laughing when he said that. But he and many others are serious when they say that scientists need to revaluate the weight they give traditional indigenous knowledge.

“This is a pretty common theme. It’s really surprising that scientists and general commentators don’t appreciate the knowledge collection and transmission of indigenous peoples, given the wealth of knowledge about medicine, physiology, geology, earth sciences, wind patterns, ice fluctuations — the incredible scope of knowledge that indigenous people have and have sustained them in North America for tens of thousands of years,” says Hayden King, director of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University and a member of the Beausoleil First Nation on Georgian Bay.

“It defies logic that this knowledge they’ve generated and transmitted wouldn’t be accurate and helpful in myriad ways.”

(via astrakiseki)

281 notes

hannibal-acca:


HANNIBAL ACCA HAS PERMISSION TO POST AND REBLOG THIS PIECE

FOR: Taylor
BY: feredir
PROMPT:  ’Matthew Brown, preferably in the white orderly uniform surrounded by dark colors.’

hannibal-acca:

HANNIBAL ACCA HAS PERMISSION TO POST AND REBLOG THIS PIECE

FOR: Taylor

BY: feredir


PROMPT:  ’Matthew Brown, preferably in the white orderly uniform surrounded by dark colors.’

(via feredir)

219 notes

gracehelbig:

buzzfeed:

This is Foo-Chan, the Japanese equivalent of Grumpy Cat. But instead of being grumpy, he just looks like he’s disappointed all of the time. 

OH NO

(via officialjipersnoe)

291,192 notes

opewinston:

toxsic:

pard-on-my-hard-on:

kingerock288:

lupercos:

(yelling) gay (normal voice) lesbian (muttering) bi….. sexual……. (confused whispering) tr…………… tran…….. trans…………..ss…………………………… (booming voice in the background) STRAIGHT  ALLIES

This sums up representation of LGBT pretty damn well

(sign language) pansexual (morse code beeps) asexual

(Ancient language of the elder gods) Nonbinary

(smoke signals) aromantic 

(via officialjipersnoe)

104,218 notes

3k626ekful7ozxujar43keiw236in2h:

sexyboitommo:

3k626ekful7ozxujar43keiw236in2h:

i was labelling stuff today and this lady scoffed at me and i was like hi and she was like writing with ur left hand is immoral. its 2014 and someone actually said that to my face

Writing with ur left hand is fine but having a URL like that is definitely not

i can’t even argue w that tbh

(via officialjipersnoe)

221,756 notes

highlyover-rated:

Have you ever bullshitted an assignment so hard you basically laugh after every sentence you write

(Source: pia-pium, via wasdica)

695,748 notes

kyubiisaan:

lowwbloods:

officialwillowpape:

i searched up ‘hurdlers without hurdles’ on google and i dont regret it

these boots are made for walkin

The ol razzle dazzle

kyubiisaan:

lowwbloods:

officialwillowpape:

i searched up ‘hurdlers without hurdles’ on google and i dont regret it

these boots are made for walkin

The ol razzle dazzle

(via polyamaura)

20,021 notes